The Making of the Ultimate Espresso, Part 2


The Making of the Ultimate Espresso, Part 2

There are some places around town where the barista pushes a button and out comes a couple of shots of espresso. It doesn’t work that way at Bean Coffee Roasters because that kind of automation costs you something in terms of flavor. Making great espresso is an art and machines just aren’t able to perform at a high enough level. I’m no expert myself but I’ve looked into some of the challenges the baristas are up against:

  1. Measuring out the ground coffee
    Assuming you have been given premium coffee to work with, you must use the right dose of freshly ground espresso beans in the portafilter to match all the other settings in the process. Too much or too little coffee will alter the taste significantly.
  2. Uniform tamping
    The precision dose of ground coffee in the portafilter needs to be tamped down to a uniform compression so the hot water passing through will move through at a consistent rate. If the water passes through too fast or too slow, your espresso will suffer.
  3. Controlled water temperature
    The espresso machine forces hot water at just the right temperature through the portafilter at just the right speed. How hot and how fast is one of those things that a master barista (in the case of Bean Coffee Roasters, Zach Kneebush) has specified to perfectly match the coarseness of the grind being used and the kind of coffee beans being used. Every kind of coffee bean has a unique personality/signature and people like Zach study how to get the best out of every bean.

As I mentioned in part 1 of this article, baristas at Bean Coffee Roasters are rigorously trained in the art of making the espresso they serve to their customers. Bean Coffee Roasters has invested in top-of-the-line coffee making equipment to make sure that every time you come in, you get an exceptional cup of coffee.

Cam Finley
For Bean Coffee Roasters